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Offline offroader

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Re: Two stroke hillclimbing
« Reply #15 on: July 27, 2010, 06:00:25 AM »
Those hillclimbers are awesome.cr500's are great in the woods when tuned correctly.Flywheel weight,correct porting,pipe jetting and head work and they are very smoothed.

Offline opfermanmotors

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Re: Two stroke hillclimbing
« Reply #16 on: July 27, 2010, 09:24:06 AM »
Or just get a Maico and no need to jump thru any hoops :)
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Offline GlennC

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Re: Two stroke hillclimbing
« Reply #17 on: July 27, 2010, 10:08:40 AM »
Jumping through Hoops?
Hoop 1 Find a Maico that runs.
Hoop 2 Find parts to keep it running
Hoop 3 Find a rider brave enough to ride a Maico on 60 miles of rocky single track.

My cr5 engine is stock except pipe, reeds, and jetting. Hardly jumping through hoops.




Offline opfermanmotors

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Re: Two stroke hillclimbing
« Reply #18 on: July 27, 2010, 10:50:18 AM »
My CR500 is the same, stock except for reeds, pipe and jetting and like I said, it's terrible.  My friend's 2001 is even worse and he did try the hoops offroader said like flywheel weight and head milling, just about everything except change the frame, which is the other hoop b/c the stock frame is just terrible on any year, way too heavy and does not turn at all.  (BTW, didn't u jump thru that hoop get and get an AF? That's a MAJOR hoop)

Maicos are surprisingly easy to find parts for and as far as 60 miles fo rocky single track I do that all the time, pretty easily infact compared to a CR500 my friend is always crying on his 2001 and envies my easy ride!  


« Last Edit: July 27, 2010, 10:57:51 AM by opfermanmotors »
Modest beginings start with a single blow of a horn, man.

Offline offroader

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Re: Two stroke hillclimbing
« Reply #19 on: July 27, 2010, 11:18:28 AM »
Sorry to say but it sounds like your friend does not have that bike set up correctly at all.Either that or he should be on a smaller bike.Not fighting or disrespecting but just saying.Would be nice to be able to buy a new maico and see how good it is.Until that happens and they are available it looks like the cr5 remains supreme.

Offline GlennC

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Re: Two stroke hillclimbing
« Reply #20 on: July 27, 2010, 11:26:17 AM »
I'm thinking it might be rider preference. Most of the CR500 guys I know think the CR's are great for trail and woods stuff, Some with lots of mods, and some with a few like mine.

I think most big bore two strokes tend to beat the rider up a little, Some of us are more willing to put up with the abuse. One thing I am sure of good throttle control is required.

Most people who I let ride my bike don't really get why I like it so much.
Most people who buy a cr500 either love it and keep it for many years, or hate it and sell it quickly.
I guess it is an acquired taste ;D

Keep the rubber side down 8)


Offline opfermanmotors

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Re: Two stroke hillclimbing
« Reply #21 on: July 27, 2010, 11:36:43 AM »
Ya, throttle control for sure is required on any 500, I just find that the wider power band of the Maicos to be much more woods friendly.  My CR500 just spins tire and I rode his CR500 so it's not just him so I don't think it's a rider issue.  Mine is actually easier in the trails but hits much harder than his does.  

Even Super Hunky says the same thing and reccomends a KTM as a great trails/woods bike.  I happen to agree since my 84 KTM 495 is actually quite awesome in the trails.  Handling isnt Maico but the power spread of that bike is just great, along with 1st gear being geared so low you can crawl.

Truthfully speaking, had I never rode a Maico or older big bore KTM I probably wouldn't complain about the CR500 and just gotten used to it (actually, in the past when I had the CR and rebuilding my Maico I did get used to the CR and was like this isnt so bad.. then when the maico was back up was like, holy cow, its like night and day the Maico just puts the CR to shame) :)  


« Last Edit: July 27, 2010, 12:10:38 PM by opfermanmotors »
Modest beginings start with a single blow of a horn, man.

Offline opfermanmotors

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Re: Two stroke hillclimbing
« Reply #22 on: July 27, 2010, 11:38:48 AM »
BTW, any one I let ride my Maico I usually get great reviews. :)
Modest beginings start with a single blow of a horn, man.

Offline GlennC

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Re: Two stroke hillclimbing
« Reply #23 on: July 27, 2010, 12:25:01 PM »
The guys i let ride mine were four stroke guys, I think they were skeerd :o

Wheel spin on the service bikes is much better than the old jalopies.

Offline opfermanmotors

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Re: Two stroke hillclimbing
« Reply #24 on: July 27, 2010, 12:39:56 PM »
This is funny, some people trying to start my CR500:

CR500 Starting (RE: KX 500)


Modest beginings start with a single blow of a horn, man.

Offline opfermanmotors

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Re: Two stroke hillclimbing
« Reply #25 on: July 27, 2010, 12:48:58 PM »


1998 Kawasaki KX 500 vs. 1983 Maico 490

He's a beginner but the only person I recorded their thoughts and the 83 isn't tuned as good as my 82 Maico or KTM, need to gear it better yet its too fast I think.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2010, 12:52:18 PM by opfermanmotors »
Modest beginings start with a single blow of a horn, man.

Offline JETZcorp

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Re: Two stroke hillclimbing
« Reply #26 on: July 27, 2010, 03:32:58 PM »
Wow!  Someone's in an argument and it's not me!

Anyway, GlennC made the comment that big-bore two-strokes beat up their riders a little bit.  While I can't speak for 490s and 500s, which I've only sampled intermittently, I can say that the most relaxed and easy-going bike I've ever ridden was a 390 Husky.  I took that on a set of trails and roads one day, then the next week took my 250 Husky (which is essentially the same bike except for the motor) and it was miserable by comparison.  Always had to keep the RPM up to keep moving, and when the power came on it was much more of a hit than the 390, even though the 390 was clearly more powerful in all points of the rev range.

I believe that 125s and 250s beat their rider up much more than any properly-done big-bore.  They require you to keep it going and spun up a lot.  And don't get me wrong, that's really fun stuff; I don't see myself ever selling that 250.  But when you get into a bike that's got the big displacement and massive low-end, I think (and I hate to say this) they start feeling like a four-stroke.  What I mean by that is they offer you the luxury of loafing about in whatever gear you want and growling up hills like you've got a winch hooked to the wheel instead of an engine.  But fortunately, unlike the four-strokes, when you do want to spin it up and take off with the front end in the air and the back sliding thither and yon, they'll let you do that, too.

And that reminds me, I recorded my thoughts from when I rode the '83, I suppose I could upload that.


Is this Maico a 440 or only a 400?  Well in all the confusion, I forgot myself.
But considering this is a 1978 Magnum, the best-handling bike in the world, you have to ask yourself one question.
Do you feel lucky, punk?

Offline opfermanmotors

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Re: Two stroke hillclimbing
« Reply #27 on: July 27, 2010, 06:04:21 PM »
Quote
I believe that 125s and 250s beat their rider up much more than any properly-done big-bore.  They require you to keep it going and spun up a lot.

While that is true, that's the terrian beating you up and making you work harder, however a 500 does beat you up more by the bike itself and not the terrian.  The bike will attempt to take off without you, plus on a 125 while it takes more work and effort on things that a 500 may find easier, the 125's are easier to stand up on, a 500 will sit you on your butt because the power, even at a slow speed, will make you feel like you're on a pull up bar, thats where the arm ripping power comes from.  So in places where you have to stand, the 500 makes it harder for you to stand up and control the bike. 

The 125's the bike itself is not beating you up, it's you just getting a work out from having to go fast and control it over the terrian.
Modest beginings start with a single blow of a horn, man.

Offline JETZcorp

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Re: Two stroke hillclimbing
« Reply #28 on: July 27, 2010, 06:31:09 PM »
Maybe it's not the bike so much as the pace.  For example, let's say you're riding with someone and there's a big hill coming up.  Even a very minor difference in bike, like between a 390 Husky and 430 Husky is going to make a big difference in how you shift and get on the power in order to keep up.  And if you want to kick the back end out and slide a turn, you can do it easily on a big-bore, do it with some effort and caution on a 250, and forget about it on a 125.  On slow and technical stuff perhaps you'd want the light weight and mellow power, but my experience has been that the bigger bike will let you take things much more slowly and give you time to think about what you're doing, rather than going bonsai like a 250.

I can see things getting tricky on your '83 though, mainly because the action on your throttle is kind of funky.  It has a little "detent" in it that makes it want to give power in zaps rather than just rolling it on.  Probably the cable just needs some oil.  I gather the 495 is also naturally zappy (like a gigantic 120) and would do that as well.


Is this Maico a 440 or only a 400?  Well in all the confusion, I forgot myself.
But considering this is a 1978 Magnum, the best-handling bike in the world, you have to ask yourself one question.
Do you feel lucky, punk?

Offline Coop

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Re: Two stroke hillclimbing
« Reply #29 on: July 27, 2010, 07:38:58 PM »
And if you want to kick the back end out and slide a turn, you can do it easily on a big-bore, do it with some effort and caution on a 250, and forget about it on a 125.  On slow and technical stuff perhaps you'd want the light weight and mellow power...


Have you ever ridden a "modern" 125 JETZ? Even my '88 KX125 will easily kick the back end out to slide and the power is anything but mellow. This is not an insult, but your problem (for lack of a better word) is you compare every bike in almost every discussion to the vintage bikes you guys own and ride. Really there is no comparison there. I love those bikes too, but I have owned and ridden enough bikes from the early 1970's through the 2000's to know that the coolness and nostalgia factor of those vintage bikes is really their best asset.  ;D
- Mike - Don't take life so seriously, nobody gets out alive.