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Offline opfermanmotors

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Looking for complete Front End
« on: November 07, 2010, 07:06:11 PM »
I don't care the bike it comes off of just looking for:

1. Complete Triple Trees
2. Front Upsidedown Forks
3. Front Wheel
4. Disc Brake on Wheel
5. Front Brake Caliper
6. Front Brake Master Cylinder
7. Front Axle

Essentially, complete front end minus the fender and handlebars!

I know I can get on ebay as well and I am looking around, thought I would place here as well in case anyone is parting something.  To help determine the steering stem that goes into the neck should be ~7 3/4" approximately and the neck bearings (top and bottom) would be ~14.8mm in height and the tapper should be less than 50mm at the widest portion.  The current ones taper from 41.8mm to 45.8mm and go into a colar, I can have a colar made to any size though as long as it's less than 50mm, which should be fine since I think most modern are only 47mm at the widest portion.

From the center of the front axle to the bottom of the triple trees should meet ~27inches.

Modest beginings start with a single blow of a horn, man.

Offline Charles Owens

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Re: Looking for complete Front End
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2010, 07:12:41 PM »
I can definately take care of you on that.
How soon are you looking to get it, and wheres it shipping to?
My shop will hopefully be ready by the end of the week, I can see what I have available.
Any ideal front ends? Make/Model?

Offline opfermanmotors

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Re: Looking for complete Front End
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2010, 08:26:53 PM »
Cool, it's not urgent but when you have something I can get it.  The shipping would be to Oregon.  No idea, I don't motocross I just do trail riding and technical/enduro.  It's going on a Maico 490, so anything that would work.  My 86 has a front end from a 87 CR125, conventional forks and that works well.  However, I was thinking here to get something more modern like upside down forks and of course a disc brake.  So anything that handles good in the technical and a 490.  Sure most any modern setup should be better than my stock maico forks.




Modest beginings start with a single blow of a horn, man.

Offline Charles Owens

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Re: Looking for complete Front End
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2010, 09:03:56 PM »
Ok, I'll keep you posted, I have a couple late 90's RM's waiting on the shop. But they both have conventional forks.
I'm sure I have a YZ or CR front end around.

Offline opfermanmotors

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Re: Looking for complete Front End
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2010, 09:32:15 PM »
I'd still consider a nice set of more modern conventional forks since I'm not really jumping, may even have less stress on the frame.
Modest beginings start with a single blow of a horn, man.

Offline SachsGS

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Re: Looking for complete Front End
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2010, 07:29:45 AM »
A lot of those early inverted forks are terrible, it's amazing I have any fillings left in my mouth! Some of the early Showas and WPs are particularly harsh. You'll be amazed at how plush your stock forks after trying some of them so I would choose carefully.

Offline opfermanmotors

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Re: Looking for complete Front End
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2010, 07:46:09 AM »
What would you consider early, my 84 KTM 495 has Upsidedown forks and ya, those are terribly stiff.  I thought by 2000 they should be better :)

I do know those conventional 87 CR125 forks are pretty good.  So, any good forks with disc brakes that fit.
Modest beginings start with a single blow of a horn, man.

Offline ford832

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Re: Looking for complete Front End
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2010, 01:54:57 PM »
Ok, I'll keep you posted, I have a couple late 90's RM's waiting on the shop. But they both have conventional forks.
I'm sure I have a YZ or CR front end around.

The late 90's RM conventional forks were an awesome fork.I'd go for those :)
I'd rather a full bottle in front of me than a full frontal lobotomy.

Offline Charles Owens

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Re: Looking for complete Front End
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2010, 02:09:28 PM »
Yeah the ones I have are a 96 and a 97, I rode the 97 for about an hour. Didn't feel bad.
I'm sure we can work something out with those.

Offline SachsGS

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Re: Looking for complete Front End
« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2010, 05:26:57 PM »
Inverted forks are lighter, more rigid and have less underhang then conventional forks, however, they have one serious design flaw.The point of greatest stress of a telescopic fork is the area just below the bottom triple clamp,here there is a tremendous bending moment as the fork assy. acts as a giant lever and tries to bend the stanchion tubes. With a conventional fork it doesn't matter as the slider is stroking merrily away on the stanchion tube below this point.With an inverted fork ,however, you have an inner tube attempting to slide in an outer tube at this point and binding occurs. It has taken manufacturers literally two decades to develop inverted forks as compliant as conventional forks from the 80's.

Bumble bees do fly and some of the old inverted forks actually weren't that bad, the Kayabas on an 89 RMX 250 were quite nice. 

Once in a blue moon Ford is actually right and I agree that the Showa conventionals as found on late 90's RMs are very nice. Other good conventional forks are the 45 and 50 Marzocchi's from the 90's. ;D

Offline opfermanmotors

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Re: Looking for complete Front End
« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2010, 07:23:27 PM »
Ya, I think I'll just go with some good 90s conventional forks so I don't have to worry about putting stress on the frame it wasn't meant for. 
Modest beginings start with a single blow of a horn, man.

Offline JETZcorp

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Re: Looking for complete Front End
« Reply #11 on: November 08, 2010, 07:40:45 PM »
Speaking of fork conversions, I seem to recall an old magazine (I think it was Modern Cycle circa '74 or '75) which showed a picture of Kenny Roberts going sideways in a flat-track event.  The caption then drew the reader's attention to the fact that he was using "Maico forks" on his Yamaha flat-tracker.  My memory isn't 100% on this, so maybe next time I'm at my dad's house I'll try and track down that issue.  I do remember it also had a superb interview with Gaylon Mosier, which might be of interest to a couple of you.


Is this Maico a 440 or only a 400?  Well in all the confusion, I forgot myself.
But considering this is a 1978 Magnum, the best-handling bike in the world, you have to ask yourself one question.
Do you feel lucky, punk?

Offline JohnN

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Re: Looking for complete Front End
« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2010, 04:21:10 AM »
In the early 1970's Factory Yamaha racer Ake Johnson put Maico forks on his factory Yamaha. At the time they were the best forks available.

Things have improved over the years and everything has gotten better, including forks...

Toby, I hope you find something you really like!
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Offline SachsGS

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Re: Looking for complete Front End
« Reply #13 on: November 09, 2010, 07:48:04 AM »
Are you still running the Corte Cosse rear shock on your Maico? The Ohlins shock is, I think, much better and if you ever managed to find a Rieger rear shock grab it because they are the best durability wise.

Offline opfermanmotors

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Re: Looking for complete Front End
« Reply #14 on: November 09, 2010, 12:48:24 PM »
The 83's all run Ohilns stock as far as I know and I believe it to be one.  I have another Ohlins for my other 83.  The 82 had the C&C shocks and I had 2 of those.  They were junk, one was broken and rewelded the other I had rebuilt and it just busted out the seals. I had a choice between Ohlins and Fox for the 82 and I chose the fox b/c it has a 0 to 10 adjustable dampening.  

The 86, not sure what it has, the suspension has all been done up. It's got 87 CR125 forks. The rear shock might be rieger, but it does have a sticker on it that says "MCR" on it.

Once I get these front forks you know what is next? perhaps rear disc brakes :)  Then it will be an extremely pimped out 83 Maico :)  The 86 Maico swingarm will fit the motor width however it's 1/2 inch wider on each side making it not being a direct fit into a 83 frame.  The 85 on motor chnged the motor mounts, so it wouldn't be a direct bolt up from 83 to a newer frame even if I got a newer frame.  Might be stuck with drum rear brakes, have to see what I can do there.
« Last Edit: November 09, 2010, 12:52:42 PM by opfermanmotors »
Modest beginings start with a single blow of a horn, man.